Business and Management

Beauty of Fused or Dichroic Glass Jewelry

Garment glass art has become one of the most popular fashion accessories today, and people search for it on the Internet or look for samples in showrooms, malls, and the like. "Wearable" glass is actually molten glass, technically known as dichroic glass, which is glass in which different oxides or quartz "fuse" on the surface in different layers or thicknesses to produce a multi-colored effect.

Dichromatic glass is a NASA invention, originally produced for use in spacesuits and later used by various industries such as optical companies (dichromatic lenses are used by various video cameras), scientific measuring instruments (particularly those that use lasers for measurement), and others. You can find exclusive glass art supplies at ArtGlassSupplies.com.

Molten glass making

Creating dichroic glass is a demanding and precisely defined process that involves vacuum chambers, electron guns, and various oxides such as titanium, magnesium, and silicon that adhere to heated glass using a technique known as thin-film physics.

Turn molten glass into accessories

Turning molten glass into jewelry is another process in itself that depends heavily on the creativity of the artist or designer. Raw dichroic glass can be polished or shaped with abrasive tools, or it can be wound with silver or other metallic threads or "hardware" that makes the piece wearable. The dichroic piece of glass can even be returned to the kiln for later rework in a process called "fire polishing".

The growing popularity of bi-colored glass for fashion accessories and other uses (like home decor, for example) has drawn many people into this field, either as manufacturers of fused glass that is then sold "unfinished" (in a sense) for others to turn to in jewelry or other accessories. Others have used their jewelry design and manufacturing expertise to combine molten glass with precious or semi-precious stones to create bracelets, earrings, necklaces, and other wearable pieces that combine the rainbow hues of bi-colored glass with the brilliance of quarried stones.

 

Flora Wilson